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Chandra Shekhar Azad

College of Horticulture

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College of Horticulture

Postgraduate classes in Horticulture were initiated in 1945 under the administrative control of Professor Agri. Botany with one Asstt. Professor, one lecturer, and one Demonstrator. In 1960 separate Department of Horticulture was created with 13 acres of Garden for practical purpose. In 1962, a one-hectare area was allotted for nursery for practical training of students, latter on one-hectare more allotted for nursery purpose.

College of Horticulture came into existence by the permission of Honb’le Governor of U.P. vide his letter no. E-7773/G.S. dt. 22.09.2010 under the university act chapter-V, 28 (i) and chapter-VI, 17(i)(2) & (3), section 28(b) and subsequently by the notification of university registrar no CSUR/2314/2010 dt. 26.10.2010 with two departments viz., Department of Fruit Science and Department of Vegetable Science.

Department of Fruit Science

The major activity of the department is teaching courses related to fruit production, floriculture, and post-harvest management to the students of B.Sc. Ag., B.Sc. Hort., M.Sc. Hort. and Ph.D. F.Sc. and conduct research to improve production, productivity, and quality of different fruit crops.

In the department, every year10 students in a master’s degree and 4-5 students in the doctoral degree program were admitted. Presently the department has 13 acres of Garden of different blocks of fruits viz., mango, guava, litchi, sapota, pomegranate, aonla, ber, phalsa, citrus fruits, jackfruit, jamun, etc., flowers (rose, tuberose, etc.) and ornamental plants for practical purposes and two acres areas under nursery for practical training of students.

Goal:

  • Collection and maintenance of different species of fruits in the garden.
  • Standardization of techniques for production, propagation and post-harvest management on fruit crops.
  • Popularizing the use of biofertilizers for substituting inorganic sources and to improve fruit quality in different fruit crops.
  • Improving fruit quality in different fruit crops with the application of macro-and micro-nutrients along with plant bio-regulators for sustainable production.

Faculty Staff:

Sl. No.

Name 

Designation

Mobile number

1.

Dr. V. K. Tripathi

Professor & Head

9450331991, 8299373118

2.

Dr. A. K. Dubey

Professor

9935865732, 9936221199

3.

Dr. J. P. Singh

Assistant Professor

9450333145, 7376240268

4.

Dr. R. K. S. Gautam

Assistant Professor

9450139856, 9369933548

5.

Dr. A. K. Dwivedi 

Assistant Professor

9515539308, 6387352912

Courses Offered for different degree Programme by the Department

SEMESTER-WISE DISTRIBUTION OF COURSES of Department

 B.Sc. (Hons.) Horticulture

I -SEMESTER

S.No.

Courses

L

P

1.

FSC-111, Fundamentals of Horticulture

2

1

2.

FLA-111, Principles of Landscape Architecture

1

1

II -SEMESTER

3.

FSC-121, Tropical and Sub-Tropical Fruits

2

1

4.

FSC-123, Plant Propagation and Nursery Management

1

1

III -SEMESTER

5.

 FSC-211 Temperate Fruit Crops

1

1

6.

FLA-211,  Commercial Floriculture

1

1

IV -SEMESTER

7.

FLA-221, Ornamental Horticulture

2

1

8.

FSC-221, Plantation Crops

2

1

9.

FSC-223, Dry Land Horticulture

1

1

V -SEMESTER

10.

FLA-311, Medicinal and Aromatic Crops

2

1

11.

FSC-311, Orchard and Estate Management

2

1

VI -SEMESTER

12.

 PHT-321, Postharvest Management of Horticultural Crops

2

1

13.

PHT-322, Processing of Horticultural Crops

1

2

VII -SEMESTER

14.

Industrial Attachment/Training RHWE-411

0

10

15.

RHWE-412

0

10

VIII -SEMESTER

16.

HEL-421, Commercial Horticulture

0

10

17.

HEL-422, Protective Cultivation of High-Value Horticulture Crops

0

10

B.Sc. (Hons.) Agriculture

I -SEMESTER

S.No.

Courses

L

P

1.

HOR-111, Fundamentals of Horticulture

1

1

IV -SEMESTER

2.

HOR-221, Production Technology for Ornamental Crops, MAP and Landscaping

1

1

3.

HOR-222, Production Technology for Fruit and Plantation Crops

1

1

4.

UGE-224, Landscaping

2

1

V -SEMESTER

5.

 UGE-313, Protected Cultivation

2

1

6.

UGE-314, Micro propagation Technologies

1

2

VI -SEMESTER

7.

HOR-321, Post-Harvest Management and Value Addition of Fruits and Vegetables

1

1

8.

UGE-321,Hi-tech Horticulture

2

1

VII -SEMESTER

9.

RAWE

0

1

VIII -SEMESTER

10.

ELP-425, Commercial Horticulture

0

10

 

M.Sc. (Horticulture) Fruit Science

I -SEMESTER

S.No.

Courses

L

P

1.

FSC-501, Tropical and Dry Land Fruit Production

2

1

2.

FSC-502, Subtropical and Temperate Fruit Production

2

1

                                                              II -SEMESTER

3.

FSC-504, Organic Horticulture

1

1

4.

FSC-505, Propagation and Nursery Management for Fruit Crops

2

1

III -SEMESTER

5.

 FSC-503, Biodiversity and Conservation  of  Fruit Crops

2

1

6.

FSC-506, Breeding of Fruit Crops

2

1

IV -SEMESTER

7.

FSC-507, Growth and Development of  Horticultural Crops

2

1

8.

FSC-591, Seminar

0

1

Ph.D. (Horticulture) Fruit Science

I -SEMESTER

S.No.

Courses

L

P

1.

FSC-601,  Advances in  Breeding of Fruit Crops

2

1

2.

FSC-602, Advances in  Production of Fruit Crops

2

1

II -SEMESTER

3.

FSC-603,  Advances in  Growth Regulation  of Fruit Crops

2

1

4.

FSC-605, Protected Cultivation

2

1

III -SEMESTER

5.

FSC-604, Biotic and Abiotic Stress Management in Horticultural  Crops

2

1

6.

FSC-606, Seminar

0

1

RESEARCH RECOMMENDATIONS:

The research achievements of the Department are as follows-

  • Propagation techniques have been standardized in a number of fruit crops viz., Mango, Guava, Litchi, Lime, Lemon, Jackfruit, Peach, Ber, Aonla, etc.
  • Standardized dose of plant bio-regulators in strawberry, phalsa, litchi, citrus, guava, mango, etc.
  • The dose of bio-fertilizers in various fruits such as strawberry, banana, etc. and micro-nutrients in guava, mango, aonla, strawberry, phalsa, litchi, etc. had been standardized.
  • Time and method of pruning in guava, phalsa, jack fruit, mango, ber, litchi, etc., had been standardized.
  • Salt tolerance studies have been conducted on several fruits viz., Mango, Guava, Ber, Grape, Aonla, Jamun, Pomegranate, Bael, etc., which help in selecting salt-tolerant strains according to the need of the orchardists.

Aonla:

Pollination study:

In aonla cultivars, Banarasi proved a good pollinizer for cv. Francis and vice versa. Therefore, both these vars need to be planted together in an orchard.

Increased fruit size with superior quality of fruits for consumer acceptability and processing industry

  • For this purpose, fruits of aonla should be bigger, more pulpy with a small stone, high TSS, and ascorbic acid content. The pre-harvest application of calcium nitrate @ 1.5 percent also increased fruit weight, the volume of fruit, pulp weight, and reduced stone weight. The calcium nitrate @ 1.5 percent also increased the TSS, total sugar, and ascorbic acid and reduced the titratable acidity content of fruits as compared to control. This technology has been applied in aonla orchard in a village which has earned growers appreciating for a higher economic yield of quality fruits.
  • In aonla cv. NA-7 treatment with a higher concentration of Borax 0.6% significantly reduced fruit drop and increases fruit retention. Spraying of GA3 at 100ppm resulted in maximum fruit yield (81.86 kg/plant), increased fruit length, width, weight, volume, specific gravity, pulp weight, pulp stone ratio, fruit moisture, ascorbic acid, TSS, and total sugars, and reduces stone weight, titratable acidity.
  • To obtain significantly reduced fruit drop and increases fruit retention with maximum fruit yield (81.25 kg/plant), increased fruit length, width, weight, volume, specific gravity, pulp weight, and maximum pulp stone ratio in aonla cv. NA-7, plants should be sprayed with a higher concentration of NAA (20ppm) and GA3 (40ppm).
  • To obtain reduced fruit drop and increases fruit retention along with higher yield with more specific gravity, more length, width, weight and volume, pulp weight, pulp: stone ratio, moisture, total sugars, and TSS Brix contents in fruits, plants of aonla cv. NA-7 should be sprayed with GA3 @ 100ppm and borax at 0.6 in August in the north Indian plains.
  • In aonla cv. NA-7 treatment with a higher concentration of Borax 0.6% significantly reduced fruit drop and increases fruit retention. Spraying of GA3 at 100ppm resulted in maximum fruit yield, increased fruit length, width, weight, volume, specific gravity, pulp weight, maximum pulp stone ratio, fruit moisture and reduces stone weight. Plant treated with GA3 @ 100ppm also results in an increase in ascorbic acid content and reduced (minimum) titratable acidity. Similarly, GA3 @ 100ppm significantly increase TSS (15.10°Brix) and total sugars (12.75%) content in fruits of Aonla.
  • To obtain reduced fruit drop and increases fruit retention along with higher yield with more specific gravity, more length, width, weight and volume, pulp weight, pulp: stone ratio, moisture, total sugars, and TSS ‘Brix contents in fruits, plants of aonla cv. NA-7 should be sprayed with zinc sulphate and borax each @ 0.6 % in August in the north Indian plains of U.P.
  • To obtain higher yield with increased fruit length, fruit width, fruit weight, fruit volume, specific gravity, pulp weight, and maximum pulp stone ratio, plants of aonla cv. NA7 should be sprayed with NAA at 20ppm and borax @ 0.4 % in August in the north Indian plains of U.P.

Increase in storage life:

  • In an experiment conducted on the effect of calcium chloride and calcium nitrate on Physico-chemical composition and shelf-life of aonla cv. Banarasi revealed the effectiveness of 1.5% calcium nitrate which improved Physico-chemical composition as compared to control and other treatments. The maximum PLW (%) and spoilage (%) and maximum TSS. ascorbic acid and minimum acidity were observed under 1.5 percent calcium nitrate pre-harvest spray treatment.
  • Physio-chemical composition of two aonla varieties indicated variability in most of the characters and, in general, Banarasi exhibited superiority for processing over Krishna the recipes and techniques for preparation of value-added products viz., jam, syrup, candy, and preserve were standardized to utilize the fruit for processing.

Banana:

Fixing maturity standards and development of uniform ripening techniques, other than carbide for the longer shelf life of Harichhal banana

  • For optimal maturity index banana should be harvest at 15-week-old shooting age when ridges on the banana fruits become flattened but visible.
  • Uniform ripening in three days can be obtained by dipping banana bunches in ethrel 800 ppm solution in warm water for the 5-minute duration in the ambient condition.
  • Dipping banana bunches in GA3 150 ppm for 30 seconds enhances the green stage (delayed ripening by 3-4 days at ambient condition.
  • By post-harvest dip of banana bunches in 2,4,5-T @ 25ppm solution for 30 seconds, shelf life can be increased up to 10 days
  • For long-distance transportation or long-term storage, banana can be stored under 13°C for up to 25 30 days.
  • Fungicide benlate @ 500 ppm treated banana packed in 200-gauge unvented polythene packets can be kept up to 10-12 days in ambient condition and up to 25-27 days in 13°C storage condition.
  • Fungicide benlate 500 ppm treated banana covered with 200 gauge vented polythene packets can be kept up to 6-7 days in ambient condition and up to 15 days in 13°C storage condition with enhanced quality.

Increase in the yield and quality of tissue cultured banana:

  • Technology developed through INM for getting the maximum yield and superior quality of tissue cultured banana cv. Grand Naine. The application of 100% RDF of NPK (50 kg N + 25 kg P+25 kg K) + 50g Azospirillum + 50g PSB + 50g Trichoderma harzianum per plant at the time of planting resulted in earliness in flowering and flowering to the harvesting of the bunch as compared to others. Maximum bunch weight, number of fingers per hand and bunch, finger weight, length, diameter, TSS, total sugars, pulp percentage and pulp: peel ratio with reduced peel percentage and titratable acidity have also been recorded. The technology has been narrated to the banana growers.
  • Tissue cultured plants of banana cv. Grand Naine fertilized with 100%RDF of NPK+50g Azosrollium + 50g + 50g PSB + 50g Trichoderma per plant significantly increased pseudo-stem height, number of functional leaves with reduced days taken for bunch initiation, days taken from bunch initiation to harvest. The same treatment also produced higher bunch weight, more number of fingers per hand, more number of hands/bunch and more yield/ha.
  • To obtain maximum girth of pseudostem, number of leaves per plant, the maximum length of inflorescence, number of fingers per hand and bunch, finger length, weight, diameter, total soluble solids, total sugars, pulp and pulp: peel ratio with the minimum amount of titratable acidity and peel, first-year ratoon banana crop (tissue culture banana) cv. Grand Naine should be treated with 100% RDF of NPK+50g Azospirillum+50g PSB+50g Trichoderma harzianum.

Increase in the yield and quality of vegetatively propagated banana:

  • In a nutritional trial on banana var. Dwarf Cavendish, it was concluded that application of 10 kg FYM+250N + 300g P+250g K/plant maximized the height, no. of leaves, and weight of bunch plant.
  • In banana cv. Dwarf Cavendish three spray of micro-nutrients mixture at 1% was significantly effective to increase TSS, total sugars, reducing sugar, and non-reducing sugar content. The maximum size of the mature finger was also obtained with three sprays of 1% micronutrient mixture. Weight of mature finger, the weight of ripe finger, pulp peel ratio, and Vitamin C were significantly increased with 60ppm of IAA solution.

Strawberry:

Plant bio-regulators promote berries yield and quality:

  • Plants treated with GA3 @ 100ppm before the flower bud initiation stage, i.e., 65 days after transplanting produced the tallest plants with the higher number of leaves and flowers. It also extended the duration of flowering, resulted in higher yield per plant having maximum length, and weight of berries also inducing earliness. On the other hand, the application of Cycocel (CCC) at 1000 ppm exhibited maximum fruit width, total soluble solids, total sugars, and ascorbic acid contents. The technology has also been demonstrated in the farmer’s field inducing some farmers to adopt the technology for strawberry production.
  • For getting a good yield of quality fruits of strawberry cv. Sweet Charlie the plants should be sprayed with GA3 and BA each at 100 ppm one month after planting in northern (Uttar Pradesh) India.

Biofertilizers promote berries yield and quality:

  • For getting berries with maximum length, width, weight, volume, TSS, total sugars, ascorbic acid with minimum titratable acidity with the higher number of crowns, number of runners per plant, plants should be supplied with Azotobacter at 7 kg/ha + vermicompost at 30 tonnes/ha under plains of central Uttar Pradesh (India).
  • In strawberry cv. Chandler, application of Azotobacter at 7 kg/ha resulted in better growth and a higher yield of quality berries with more propagating materials.

Micronutrients and mulching promote berries yield and quality:

  • In strawberry cv. Chandler foliar spray of 0.4% ZnSO4 proved most effective in improving yield and quality characters.
  • In a mulching trial conducted on strawberry cv. Sweet Charlie, the polyethylene mulch was found to be the best mulching material with respect to growth, fruiting, yield and quality parameters.
  • Also, use of black polythene mulch and 20th October planting proved the most effective treatments with respect to growth, flowering, fruiting, yield and quality of fruits.

Mango:

Mango malformation:

Foliar application of 200 ppm of NAA in mid-October alone or followed by De blossoming is very effective in reducing mango malformation.

Increase in the fruit retention, yield, and quality of mango:

  • To obtain significantly reduced fruit drop and increases fruit retention with maximum fruit yield (54.70kg/tree), increased fruit length, width, weight, volume, specific gravity, pulp percent, total soluble solids, total sugars, ascorbic acid content with a decrease in the peel, stone percent and titratable acidity contents, mango cv. Dashehari plants should be sprayed with the combined application of GA3 (60ppm) + ZnSO4 (1.0%) in March under north India.
  • To obtain significantly reduced fruit drop and increases fruit retention with maximum fruit yield (54.70kg/tree), increased fruit length, width, weight, volume, specific gravity, pulp percent, total soluble solids, total sugars, ascorbic acid content with a decrease in the peel, stone percent and titratable acidity contents, mango cv. Amrapali, plants should be sprayed with combined application of GA3 (50ppm) + NAA (40ppm) in the month of March under north India.

CITRUS PROPAGATION:

Citrus:

A study conducted on the effect of INM on growth and yield of Coriander as intercrop in citrus revealed a significant increase in yield (18.50g/ha) with the application of 25% RDF+FYM 10t/ha + Azospirillum + VAM followed by 25% RDF-FYM (17.00q/ha).

Sweet lime:

  • In a propagational trial, sweet lime stem cuttings treated with IBA 1500 ppm + PHB 1000 ppm exhibited improved shoot and root development as well as success and survival percent.
  • Wounding + 1500 ppm IBA found significantly most effective in causing earliest sprouting, vegetative and root growth of stem cutting in lemon var. Pant lemon -1.
  • For obtaining maximum unique newly plant for plantation of sweet lime through stem cutting, cuttings should be treated with IBA 200ppm for early sprouting, increased in the number of sprouts, the diameter of sprouts and percentage of rooted cuttings.
  • Genetically pure newly plants of Kagzi lime can be obtained through stem cutting with the treatment of IBA 3000 ppm + NAA 3000 ppm.

Cape gooseberry:

Increase in the growth, yield, and quality of cape gooseberry:

Application of vermicompost 2t/ha + 75% RDF significantly increased plant height, plant spread, number of leaves per plant, No. of branches per plant, No. of fruit per /plant, fruit weight, and yield per plant. So as far as quality characters are concerned application of vermicompost 2t/ha + 75% RDF also significantly increased TSS, ascorbic acid and reduced acidity content in cape gooseberry.

Phalsa (Yield and Quality):

  • In phalsa cv. Sharbati, spraying of GA3 at 50 ppm increased yield and quality parameters and Ethrel at 1000 ppm resulted in early and uniform maturity.
  • In Phalsa, all the growth, yield, and quality characters of phalsa significantly increased under paddy straw mulches followed by sugar cane trash except acidity compared with control.
  • In phalsa, application of GA3 at 60ppm increased the average length of shoot, fruit set and yield of phalsa fruits. Application of 500ppm and 1000ppm ethereal caused maximum number of leaves/bush, shorter harvest span, the diameter of berry. TSS, maximum sugar content, and producing less acidic fruits.
  • Spraying of Boron 40 ppm+GA3 30ppm is found very effective for improving yield for enhancing economy and prosperity of phalsa in the country.
  • Application of 500 ppm and 1000 ppm Ethrel caused the maximum number of leaves, length of leaves, width of leaves, fruit set, diameter of berry, fruit weight, TSS, yield and application of 250ppm ethrel results in maximizing ascorbic acid and sugar content and producing less acidic fruits.
  • Foliar sprays of Boron 50 ppm+GA3 30ppm brought about significant changes in the plant metabolism improving size, weight and quality of phalsa fruits. So growers may safely adopt the application of Boron 50 ppm+GA3 30ppm for increased yield of quality fruits of phalsa under North-Gangetic plains of India.

Phalsa (Pruning Effect):

  • Plants pruned at 40.00 cm from the ground level on 15 Dec. proved most effective in improving vegetative growth, bud sprouting, the number of leaves and all other quality parameters like TSS, sugar, ascorbic acid content, fruit size and yield, while less acidity and less internodal length were also recorded under the same treatment.

Peach:

Propagation of peach through hardwood stem cuttings:

Peaches are commercially propagated either by budding or grafting. However, the production cost of such plants is quite high while the multiplication of plants by cutting is simple, cheap and rapid. To develop this technology, the cuttings (20 x 25cm) were treated with IBA 2000 + PHB 1000 + B50 ppm which exhibited early sprouting, higher sprouting percentage and more diameter of sprouts, increased number of leaves and roots with longest and thickest size, more root formation zone, best rooting and survival percentage. The farmers/ growers have visited the field in the department.

Propagation of peach through hardwood stem cuttings:

Peaches are commercially propagated either by budding or grafting. However, the production cost of such plants is quite high while the multiplication of plants by cutting is simple, cheap and rapid. To develop this technology, the cuttings (20 x 25cm) were treated with IBA 2000 + PHB 1000 + B50 ppm which exhibited early sprouting, higher sprouting percentage and more diameter of sprouts, increased number of leaves and roots with longest and thickest size, more root formation zone, best rooting and survival percentage. The farmers/ growers have visited the field in the department.

Influence of severity and time of pruning:

  • Pruning study conducted on young subtropical peach plants cv. Saharanpur Prabhat revealed that it should be lightly pruned (15 buds/shoot) in early January for better results with respect to flowering, fruiting, and yield.
  • An experiment conducted to see the effect of extent and time of pruning in peach revealed that the plants pruned on 5 February retaining 10 buds/shoot exhibited numerically greater size and weight of fruit.
  • In case of peach 15 bud/shoot pruning at 15 Dec. to 1st Jan pruning treatment proved most effective with respect to flowering, fruiting, and yield of fruits of young-bearing plants cv. Saharanpur Prabhat.
  • Increase in fruit retention, yield and quality:

  • The application of a pre-harvest spray of zinc sulphate at 0.4 percent 25 days before harvest proved most effective for improving the quality at harvest and storage period to maximize the shelf life of fruit.
  • The pre-harvest spray of calcium nitrate at 10 percent, 20 days before harvest proved most effective for improving the quality and harvest und during the storage period and for maximizing the shelf life of peach fruits.
  • Litchi:

  • In litchi foliar application of zinc cine sulphate (0.5%) improved fruit size, fruit weight, pulp weight, pulp: stone ratio, yield, and organoleptic rating. The fruit cracking was minimized by foliar application of Boron (Borax, 0.4%) while application of NAA (25ppm) exhibited minimum fruit drop.
  • In two years, trial with litchi, application of organic manure (FYM 30 kg + poultry manure 10 kg + vermicompost 5 kg + neem cake 3 kg/tree) significantly increased the panicle length, percentage of fruit set, fruit yield, and TSS. However, there was no significant effect on the duration of flowering and fruit size further treatments of fruits with 6 per cent wax emulsion and packing in perforated LDPE bags reduced weight loss, spoilage and respiration rate.
  • Pre-harvest spray of Ca (NO)2 at 2.0 % proved effective in maintaining must quality and plunging in litchi fruits during storage at ambient conditions. It minimized PLW and spoilage losses
  • Combined application of NAA at 20 ppm and zinc sulphate at 0.6 % proved most effective in increasing fruit set, fruit size, weight, fruit yield, TSS and total sugar content of the cv. Calcuttia.
  • INM in Ber:

  • In ber, application of 1000g N +500g P +250g K + 50 kg FYM promoted vegetative growth attributes significantly i.e., no. and length of shoots, no. of secondary and tertiary shoots, flowering and fruiting parameters, days to flower initiation, duration of blossoming and fruit development period were also recorded longer. When the NPK dose was slightly reduced keeping FYM stable fruit set, their retention, size, and weight of fruit were augmented significantly superior. The plants under control expressed significantly poor vegetative growth, flowering, and fruiting parameters, quality attributes, yield and yield components.

Guava:

Crop Regulation:

To get heavy and quality winter crop of guava and to avoid rainy season crop, a spray of 16.00 percent urea or shoot pruning (upper 30 cm part) in Ist week of May proved useful.

Shelf-life:

Pre-harvest spraying of Zinc slphate at 0.4 % 25 days before harvest proved most effective for improving quality and the shelf life of guava fruits cv. Sardar.

Rejuvenation and canopy management:

Experiment on Rejuvenation and canopy management in guava indicated that 40% of pruning produced the tallest plants (6.35 mt.). Canopy both E-W and N-S were also significantly greater under this treatment. Significantly heavier fruits and yield/plant were produced under 40% pruning and fruits have higher TSS, total sugar, and vit. C content with lower acidity.

Studies on etiology and management of guava wilt and identification of resistant rootstock.

  • To solve the problem of guava wilt, a survey was made in Kanpur and surrounding districts. It was observed that the maximum severity of the disease was found in district Kannauj (30.14% followed by 18.33% in Farrukhabad). Fusarium oxysporum was found responsible for it.
  • 20 gm Aspergillus niger (Pusa mrida) as well as Trichoderma viride mixed with 20 kg FYM per plant, applied in July has been found effective against the disease
  • In July, application of slacked lime (1.80 kg) in Ganga Katri and Zypsum (3.0 kg) per tree in uplands at root level was found to be effective to minimize the disease.
  • Psidium friedrichsthalianum has been found resistant to wilt.
  • Linseed as an intercrop with guava was found to be effective to minimize the disease.
  • For Newly planted plants of guava NPK, 50:20:40 gram per plant was found to be the best in terms of growth parameters.
  • In existing orchards for fruiting trees, NPK @ 400:160:320 g along with 50 kg FYM and 0.5% micronutrients (Zn, B, Cu and Mn) per plant was found most effective in controlling the wilt disease.
  • Biological control revealed that 20g Aspergillus niger (Pusa Mrida) as well as Trichoderma viride mixed with 20 Kg. FYM per plant was effective. Further, Psidium fridrichathalianum was found resistant to root-stock against the wilt.

Post-harvest:

  • A study on the processing and storage of ginger beverages revealed that the rhizome of Pahari ginger can be very well used for producing quality beverages like RTS, squash, and syrup and these products may have excellent marketing potential because of their reasonably longer shelf life.
  • In tomato cv. Angoorlata proved to be best for colour retention in prepared juice and the use of sodium benzoate was found to be superior as a preservative.

TRAININGS / EXTENSION ACTIVITIES:

Kishan Mela –

Department actively participates in Kisan Mela of the University and display departmental technologies, shares knowledge, etc. for the benefits of the farmers/ entrepreneurs /stakeholders, to the growers of fruit crops in a profitable manner. Department also renders expert advice in the following areas:

  • Fruit production
  • Plant propagation
  • HRD activities
  • Establishment of Nurseries, Hi-tech horticulture etc.
  • Post-harvest management & processing technologies

Mission

  • To pursue excellence in teaching and research activities of different fruit crops.
  • To conduct applied and strategic research on improvement and production technology of major and minor fruit crops.
  • To disseminate information on recent technological advances in fruit production, propagation, and post-harvest management.
  • To provide advisory and consultancy services on different aspects of fruit production.
  • Besides above, there is a strong emphasis on human resource development for horticultural research through post-graduate teaching and standardizing techniques in production, propagation, post-harvest handling, and other aspects of fruit crops.
  • To enhance the livelihood of orchardists by increasing income by providing excellent research findings of production and management, solving their horticulture-related problems and providing quality planting materials.

Vision:

Emphasis on human resource development through excellence in teaching and research activities of Horticulture in frontline areas of fruit production, propagation, and post-harvest management.

Mandates

  • Imparting teaching to the undergraduate Agriculture/Horticulture along with M.Sc. Hort. (F.Sc.) and Ph.D. Fruit Science students for acquiring them quality education.
  • Providing research guidance to the post-graduate (M.Sc. Hort. (F.Sc.) and Ph.D. Fruit Science) students to fulfill their degree programme requirements.
  • Solving various problems of the farmers/orchardists related to horticultural crops especially fruits and flowers, time to time through phone, print media and directly in different training programmes.
  • Standardization of agro-techniques for different fruit crops for quality production of higher yield.
  • To impart graduate and post-graduate education and training for human resource development.

AWARDS & HONOURS (Last Five Years):

2015

  • Dr. V. K. Tripathi was awarded “Young Scientist Award” for outstanding contribution in Horticulture on the occasion of the National Conference on Global Research Initiates for Sustainable Agricultural & Allied Science, Organized by Astha Foundation, Meerut (U.P.) India at RVSKVV, Gwalior (M.P.) during 12-13 December 2015.
  • 2016

  • Dr. V. K. Tripathi was awarded “Dr. Ram Kripal Pathak Vishisht Krishi Vaigyanic Horticulture (Fruits) Puraskar-2015” by Hon’ble Governor of U.P. Sri Ram Nayak Ji, for his outstanding contribution in the field of horticulture (fruits) on the occasion of 3rd Utter Pradesh Agricultural Science Congress “Strategic Governance and Technological Advance for Sustainable Agriculture” organized by CSAUAT Kanpur, UPCAR and UPAAS Lucknow at CSAUAT Kanpur during March 2-4, 2016.
  • “Fellow Award 2015” was confirmed to Dr. V. K. Tripathi, on the occasion of the National Conference on Recent Advance in Diversified Agricultural System at Muzaffarnagar (U.P.) during 20-21 Feb 2016.
  • Dr. V. K. Tripathi was awarded “Excellence in Teaching Award” during the National Conference on “Innovative and Current Advances in Agriculture & Allied Science” Jointly organized by SSDAT, Meerut (U.P.) and Astha Foundation, Meerut (U.P.) at Prof. Jaishankar Telangana State Agriculture University, Rajendranagar, Hyderabad (Telangana) During Dec. 10-11, 2016 from Society for Scientific Development in Agriculture & Technology.
  • 2017

  • “Fellow Award 2015” was confirmed to Dr. V. K. Tripathi, from Society for Scientific Development in Research & Tech. during the International Conference on “Global Research Initiatives for Sustainable Agriculture & Allied Sciences (GRISAAS-2017)” held on December 02–04, 2017, at MPUAT, Udaipur, Rajasthan.
  • Dr. V. K. Tripathi was awarded “Letter of Appreciation” by The Hon’ble Vice-Chancellor, CSAUA&T, Kanpur for Constant efforts, Dedication and Commendable Job in organizing National conference on “Farmers’ Centric Agri-innovation for Sustainable Development” at Kanpur India during March 24- 25, 2017.
  • Dr. V. K. Tripathi was awarded “Letter of Appreciation” by The Hon’ble Vice-Chancellor, CSAUA&T, Kanpur for his dedication, managerial capacity and all over efforts as Co-organizing Secretary in the organization of two days training programme on “Agricultural Research with relation to IPR” at CSAUA&T, Kanpur during August 16-17, 2017.
  • 2018

  • Dr. V. K. Tripathi was awarded the “Outstanding Achievement Award” during International Conference on “Global Research Initiatives for Sustainable Agriculture & Allied Sciences (GRISAAS-2018)” held 28–30 October 2018 at Rajasthan Agricultural Research Institute, Durgapura, Jaipur, Rajasthan.
  • 2019

  • Dr. V. K. Tripathi was awarded “Prof. P. B. Patil Memorial Award-2019” during National Symposium on “Horticulture in the vanguard of Climate Change and Urban Environment (HVCCUE-2019)” held on 07–08 February 2019 at Annamalai University, Annamalai Nagar, Tamil Nadu (In absentia).
  • Dr. V. K. Tripathi was awarded “Excellence in Research Award” during International Conference on “Advances in Agriculture & Allied Science Research” held on Feb. 23-23, 2019 at Rama University, Kanpur.
  • Dr. V. K. Tripathi was awarded “IMRF Eminent Horticulturist Award” during the International Conference on Recent Trends in Agriculture, Environmental Sustainability & Climate Change-2019, held at the University of Malaya, Wisma R&D, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia during 16-18 August 2019.
  • Dr. V. K. Tripathi was awarded “Best Presentation Award” for the paper “Influence of GA3 and ZnSO4 alone and in combination on fruit drop, yield and quality of Mango cv. Dashehari” authored by Tripathi, V.K., Kumar, Y, Gupta, S and Vivekanand (2019). In International Conference on Recent Trends in Agriculture, Environmental Sustainability & Climate Change-2019, held at University of Malaya, Wisma R&D, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia during 16-18 August 2019.
  • Dr. V. K. Tripathi was awarded “Certificate of Appreciation” for acting as a Chairmen of a session, during International Conference on Recent Trends in Agriculture, Environmental Sustainability & Climate Change-2019, held at the University of Malaya, Wisma R&D, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia during 16-18 August 2019.
  • Dr. V. K. Tripathi was awarded “ISHRD Best Teacher Award-2018” from the Indian Society of Horticultural Research and Development, Ranikhet, Chaubattia, Almora (Uttarakhand) during “Progressive Horticulture Conclave-2019 on Futuristic Technologies in Horticulture” held on Dec. 08-10, 2019 at ICAR-IISR, Lucknow.
  • Awarded with “Academic Fellow Award” from Academy for Environment and Life Science, Agra (U.P.) during National Conference on “Recent Trends and New Frontiers in Biotechnology, Agriculture, Science and Environment (NCRTNFBASE-2020)” held on Feb. 22-23, 2020 at Dept of Botany, St. Johns, Agra, U.P.
  • Awarded with “Third Best Oral Presentation Award” for the paper “Impact of Covid-19 on mango production” in oral theme 9 of the NATIONAL WEBCON on Agriculture Production and Support System Managing Covid 19 pandemic: Experience Sharing and Strategies, at C.S. Azad University of Agriculture & Technology, Kanpur during 6-8 May 2020.
  • Awarded with “Certificate of Appreciation” from The Society for Advancement in Agriculture, Horticulture and Allied Sectors (SAAHAS), Prayagraj for delivering a Lead/Invited Lecture and valuable contribution on ‘Soil-less Media Cultures in Horticultural Crop Production’ in One Day National Workshop on Hydroponics and Soil Less Culture dated March 1st, 2021, organized by Department of Horticulture, SHUATS, in association with Society for Advancement in Agriculture, Horticulture and Allied Sectors at SHUATS, Prayagraj.
  • Awarded with “Excellence in Teaching Award” from Hindustan Agricultural Research Welfare Society, Ranikhet, Chaubattia, Agra (U.P.) on the occasion of National Conference on “Bhartiya Krishi Ke Naye Kirtiman-2021” held on June 06-07, 2021 through virtual mode.

PUBLICATIONS OF THE DEPARTMENT (Last Five Years):

A. Research articles

2015

  • Tripathi, V. K.; Kumar, S. and Gupta, A.K. (2015). Influence of Azotobacter and Vermicompost on growth, flowering, yield and quality of strawberry cv. Chandler. Indian Journal of Horticulture, 72 (2): 201-205. (Journal Id.- I070, NAAS Rating: 6.10).
  • Tripathi, V.K. and Gupta, A.K. (2015). Efficacy of Azotobacter and Vermicompost alone and in combination on vegetative growth, flowering and yield of strawberry (Fragaria x ananassa Duch.) cv. Chandler. Progressive Horticulture, 44 (2): 256-261. (Journal Id.- P159, NAAS Rating: 3.53).
  • Tripathi, V.K.; Bahadur, S.; Dubey, Vishal and Kumar, A. (2015). Influence of integrated nutrient management on yield and physico-chemical parameters of aonla cv. NA-7. Progressive Research-An International Journal, 10 (Special-VI): 3493-3496. (Journal Id.- P160, NAAS Rating: 3.84).
  • Kumar, A., Tripathi, V. K.; Dubey, A.K. and Dubey, V. (2015). Influence of integrated nutrient management on fruit set, yield and physico-chemical parameters of winter season guava. Progressive Research-An International Journal, 10 (Special-VII): 3722-3724. (Journal Id.- P160, NAAS Rating: 3.84).
  • Kumar, Sharavan and Singh, J.P. (2015). Influences of plant geometry and nutrition on yield attributes and yield of Okra. Hortflora Research Spectrum, 4 (4):356-360. (Journal Id.-H018, NAAS Rating: 3.78).
  • Lal, Deepa; Tripathi, V. K.; Kumar, S. and Nayyar, M. A. (2015). Effect of pre-harvest application of Gibberellic Acid, Naphthalene acetic acid and Calcium Nitrate on yield, quality and Shelf-life of Kinnow Mandarin. Research in Environment & Life Science, 8 (4): 561-564. (Journal Id.- R036, NAAS Rating: 3.74).

2016

  • Lal, Deepa; Tripathi, V.K.; Nayyar, M.A.; Kumar, S.; Ahmad, M. and Siddiqui M.W. (2016). Pre-Harvest spray of gibberellic acid, NAA and Calcium Nitrate on Fruit retention, yield and quality of Kinnow Mandarin. Environment and Ecology 34 (4C): 2288-2292. (Journal Id.- E071, NAAS Rating: 4.18).
  • Tripathi, V.K.; Kumar, S.; Kumar, K.; Kumar, S. and Dubey, V. (2016). Influence of Azotobacter, Azospirillum and PSB on vegetative growth, flowering, yield and quality of strawberry cv. Chandler. Progressive Horticulture, 48(1):49-53. (Journal Id.- P159, NAAS Rating: 3.53).
  • Tripathi,V. K., Jain, A., Dubey,V., Kumar, A. and Pandey, H. (2016). Effect of different levels of Azotobactor, Azospisillum, PSB and black polythene mulch on growth, yield and quality of strawberry cv. Chandler. Progressive Research-An International Journal, 11 (Special VIII): 5185-5188. (Journal Id.- P160, NAAS Rating: 3.84).
  • Tripathi, A. K.; Shukla I. N. and Dwivedi, A. K. (2016). Response of organically grown cauliflower (B. oleracea var. Bortrytis) two different sources and rates of organic manures in indogangatic plains of Uttar Pradesh. Current Adv. in Agril. Sci., 8 (1): 32-35. (Journal Id.-C160, NAAS Rating: 4.49).
  • Singh, J.P. and Jaiswal, A. K. (2016). Effect of seedling age on growth and flowering attributes of tomato (Lycopecicon esulentum Mill). Hortflora Research Spectrum, 5 (3): 251-254. (Journal Id.-H018, NAAS Rating: 3.78).
  • Tomar, S.; Dubey, A. K.; Singh, S. K. and Ujjwal, Vivak (2016). Effect of different levels of NAA, GA3 and 2,4-D on growth and yield of Tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.). Annals of Horticulture, 9 (1): 97-100. (Journal Id.-A189, NAAS Rating: 3.42).

2017

  • Tripathi, V. K.; Jain, A.; Kumar, S.; Dubey, V. and Kumar, A. (2017). Efficacy of bio-fertilizers and mulching on growth, yield and quality of strawberry (Fragaria × ananassa) cv. Chandler. Indian Journal of Agricultural Sciences, 87 (9): 1179–83. (Journal Id.- I029, NAAS Rating: 6.23).
  • Kumar, A.; Tripathi, V. K.; Dubey, V.; Katiyar, N.K. and Tiwari, P. (2017). Influence of foliar application of calcium, zinc and boron on fruit drop, yield and quality attributes of Aonla (Emblica officinalis) cv. NA-7. Research on Crops, 18 (1): 91-97. (Journal Id.-R039, NAAS Rating: 4.75).
  • Tripathi, V. K. (2017). Influence of integrated nutrient management in ratoon crop of tissue cultured banana. Progressive Research–An International Journal, 12 (Special-IV): 2577-2580. (Journal Id.- P160, NAAS Rating: 3.84).
  • Singh, T.; Tripathi, V. K. and Tiwari, P. (2017). Influence of pre-harvest application of plant bio-regulators and micronutrients on fruit retention, yield and quality attributes of mango. Progressive Research–An International Journal, 12 (Special-IV): 2640-2644. (Journal Id.- P160, NAAS Rating: 3.84).
  • Tiwari, P.; Tripathi, V. K. and Singh, A. (2017). Effect of foliar application of plant bio-regulators and micronutrients on fruit retention, yield and quality attributes of Aonla. Progressive Research–An International Journal, 12 (Special-IV): 2565-2568. (Journal Id.- P160, NAAS Rating: 3.84).
  • Vachan, R. and Tripathi, S. M. (2017). Study on the effect of bio-fertilizers with chemical fertilizers on plant growth, yield and economies of rabi season onion (Allium cepa L.) cv. NHRDF Red-2. Journal of Pharmacogrosy and Phytochemistry, 6 (5): 1496-1499. (Journal Id.-J399, NAAS Rating: 5.21).
  • Singh, J.P.; Dwivedi, A.K. and Jaiswal, A. K. (2017). Influence of seedling age on yield attributes and yield of tomato (Lycopecicon esulentum Mill). Hortflora Research Spectrum, 6 (1):39-42. (Journal Id.-H018, NAAS Rating: 3.78).
  • Mohd. Zeeshan and Singh, J.P. (2017). Studies on effect of foliar application of boron and GA3 on growth flowering, fruiting and yield of phalsa (Grewia subinalqualis D.C.). Hortflora Research Spectrum, 7 (1): 52-57. (Journal Id.-H018, NAAS Rating: 3.78).
  • Tomar, S.; Singh, S. K.; Dubey, A. K.; Singh, J. P. and Abhishek (2017). Role of plant hormones on vegetative growth of Tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.), International Journal of Current Microbiology and Applied Sciences, 6 (9): 3319-3323. (Journal Id.-I199, NAAS Rating: 5.38).
  • Dixit, S. and Dubey, A. K. (2017). Medicinal properties of Garlic (Allium sativum L.): A Review. Hortflora Research Spectrum, 6 (1): 66-68. (Journal Id.-H018, NAAS Rating: 3.78).
  • Dixit, S., Dubey, A. K., Singh, V.P. and Dube, H.V. (2017). Performance of different promising lines of garlic (Allium sativum L.) under Central Plain Zone of Uttar Pradesh. Global Journal of Bio-Science and Biotechnology, 6 (4) 2017:667-670. (Journal Id.-G039, NAAS Rating: 4.13).

2018

  • Tripathi, V. K., Pandey, S. S., Kumar, A., Dubey, V. and Tiwari, P. (2018). Influence of foliar application of Gibberellic acid, Calcium and Boron on fruit drop, yield and quality attributes of aonla cv. NA-7. Indian Journal of Agricultural Sciences, 88 (11): 1784–88. (Journal Id.- I029, NAAS Rating: 6.23).
  • Pandey, H. P., Pathak, R. K., Sachan, A. K., Tripathi, V. K. and Kumari, A. (2018). Response of inorganic fertilizer and biofertilizer on biological yield and quality of hybrid rice (Oryza sativa L.) in indo-gangetic plains of central Uttar Pradesh. Journal of Pharmacognosy and Phytochemistry, 7(6): 1403-1408. (Journal Id.-J399, NAAS Rating: 5.21).
  • Bhadauria, A. S.; Tripathi, V.K.; Singh, A. and Gupta, S. (2018). Effect of foliar application of plant bio-regulators and micronutrients on fruit retention, yield and quality attributes of Aonla. Progressive Research–An International Journal, 13 (3): 216-219. (Journal Id.- P160, NAAS Rating: 3.84).
  • Tripathi, V. K.; Singh, A.; Bhadauria, A. S. and Gupta, S. (2018). Influence of GA3 and Naphthalene Acetic Acid alone and in combination on fruit drop, yield and quality of mango cv. Amrapali. Progressive Research–An International Journal, 14 (1): 10-13. (Journal Id.- P160, NAAS Rating: 3.84).
  • Mohd Zeeshan and Singh, J.P. (2018). Studies on foliar application of boron and GA3 on physico-chemical composition and yield of phalsa (Grewia subinalqualis D.C.). Hortflora Research Spectrum, 7 (1): 52-57. (Journal Id.- H018, NAAS Rating: 3.78).
  • Singh, J., Singh, J.P. and Yadav, A. (2018). Response of spray of urea and dipotassium phosphate on floral parameter and floret production of gladiolus. Hortflora Research Spectrum, 7 (2):168-170. (Journal Id.- H018, NAAS Rating: 3.78).
  • Vachan, R. and Tripathi, S.M. (2018). Influence of bio-fertilizer with recommended doses of fertilizers on plant growth, yield, quality and economies of onion (Allium cepa L.) cv. NHRDF RED-2. International Journal of Pure and Applied Bioscience, 6 (1): 1434-1441. (Journal Id.- I314, NAAS Rating: 4.74).
  • Dixit, S.; Dube, H.V.; Dubey, A. K. and Singh, V. P. (2018). Yield and nutrient uptake of garlic (Allium sativum L.) as influenced by sulphur nutrition. Journal of Pharmacognosy and Phytochemistry, 7(2):1961-1963. (Journal Id.-J399, NAAS Rating: 5.21).
  • Dixit, S.; Dubey, A. K.; Dube, H.V. and Dwivedi, P. K. (2018). Effect of integrated management of inorganic and organic fertilizers on yield, soil fertility and storage life of onion (Allium cepa L.). International Journal of Chemical Studies, 6(2): 3077-3080. (Journal Id.-I185, NAAS Rating: 5.31).
  • Dixit, S.; Dubey, A. K. and Dube, H.V. (2018). Studies on the efficiency of salicylic acid (SA) as foliar spray on growth, yield components of onion (Allium cepa L.). International Journal of Advanced Biological Research, 8(2): 238-240. (Journal Id.-I145, NAAS Rating: 4.64).
  • Dixit, S.; Dubey, A. K.; Dube, H.V. and Singh, V.P. (2018). Effect of different weed management strategies on weed dynamics and yield of Rabi onion (Allium cepa L.). The Asian Journal of Horticulture, 13(1):18-21. (Journal Id.-T016, NAAS Rating: 3.26)
  • Kumar Rajeev, Tripathi, V.K., Tomar Saurabh, Chaudhary Mahendra (2018a). Effect of best plant bio-regulators and micronutrient for achieving higher yield and quality of mango (Mangifera indica L.) fruits cv. Amrapali. Journal of Plant Development Sciences, 10 (11): 599-604 (Journal Id.- J420, NAAS Rating: 4.57)
  • Kumar Rajeev, Tripathi, V.K., Tomar Saurabh, Chaudhary Mahendra, Jeevan Ram (2018b). Effect of best plant bio-regulators and micronutrient for getting higher fruit setting in mango (Mangifera indica L.) cv. Amrapali. Journal of Plant Development Sciences 10 (11): 701-705. (Journal Id.- J420, NAAS Rating: 4.57)

2019

  • Singh, A. C., Kumar, K., Saini, P. K., Singh, V. and Singh J.P. (2019). Effect of NAA and Zinc sulphate on fruiting and yield of litchi (Litchi chininsis Sonn.) cv. Calcutia. International Journal of Current Microbiology and Applied Science, 8 (3): 836-843. (Journal Id.- I199, NAAS Rating: 5.38).
  • Badal, D. S.; Dwivedi, A. K.; Singh, S.; Prakash, A.; Verma, S. and Kumar, J. (2019). Effect of organic manures and inorganic fertilizers on growth, yield and its attributing traits in garlic (Allium sativam L.). Journal of Pharmacognogy and Phytochemistry, 8(3) 587-590. (Journal Id.- J399, NAAS Rating: 5.21).
  • Singh, J.; Dwivedi, A.K. and Devi, P. (2019). Effect of plant growth regulators on yield attributing and quality trait of Tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.). International Journal of Chemical Studied, 7 (1): 1798-1801. (Journal Id.- I185, NAAS Rating: 5.31).
  • Singh, J.; Dwivedi, A.K.; Devi, P.; Bajeli, J.; Tripathi, A. and Maurya, S. K. (2019). Effect of plant growth regulators on growth and yield attributing of Tomato (Solanum lycopersicom Mill.). International Journal of Current Microbiology and Applied Science, 8 (1): xx-xx. (Journal Id.- I199, NAAS Rating: 5.38).
  • Singh, J.; Dwivedi, A.K. and Ramgiry, P. (2019). Effect of 2,4-D, NAA and GA3 on morphological, yield and quality traits in vegetable crops (Review article). International Journal of Chemical Studied, 7 (2): 1954-1956. (Journal Id.- I185, NAAS Rating: 5.31).
  • Singh, S. and Singh, J.P. (2019). Fruit cracking, marketable yield and quality of litchi as influenced by sprays of NAA and boron. International Journal of Chemical Studies, 7(4): 1730-1735. (Journal Id.-I185, NAAS Rating: 5.31).
  • Singh, S. and Singh, J.P. (2019). Effect of foliar sprays of NAA and boron on flowering, fruiting, fruit retention and yield of litchi (Litchi chinensis Sonn.). International Journal of Chemical Studies, 7(4): 1995-1999. (Journal Id.-I185, NAAS Rating: 5.31).
  • Dubey, A.K., Tomar, S. and Tripathi, V.K. (2019). Effects of transplanting schedule and types of mulching on yield and quality of tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.). Progressive Horticulture, 51(2):177-180. (Journal Id.-I185, NAAS Rating: 5.31).

2020

  • Neha, S., Yadav, S.S., Tripathi, V.K. and Singh, A.K. (2020). Impact of weather parameters on flowering behavior of different mango varieties in central plain zone of Uttar Pradesh. International Journal of Current Microbiology and Applied Science, 9 (2):1089-1098. (Journal Id.- I199, NAAS Rating: 5.38).
  • Singh, Amar and Tripathi, V. K. (2020). Influence of integrated nutrient management on growth, yield and quality parameters of papaya (Carica papaya L.). Journal of Pharmacognosy and Phytochemistry 9 (5): 2022-2026. (Journal Id.- J399, NAAS Rating: 5.21).
  • Singh, Amar and Tripathi, V. K. (2020). Influence of INM on vegetative growth, fruiting, yield and soil physical characters in papaya (Carica papaya L.). International Journal of Current Microbiology and Applied Science, 9 (10): 2319-7706. (Journal Id.- I199, NAAS Rating: 5.38).
  • Maurya, P.K., Tripathi, V. K. and Gupta, Shubham (2020). Effect of pre-harvest application of GA3, Naphthalene acetic acid and borax on fruit drop, yield and quality of Mango cv. Amrapali. Journal of Pharmacognosy and Phytochemistry 9 (6): 2123-2127(Journal Id.- J399, NAAS Rating: 5.21).
  • . Singh, Amar and Tripathi, V. K. (2020). Influence of integrated nutrient management on flowering, fruiting, yield and quality parameters of papaya (Carica papaya L.). International Journal of Agriculture Sciences, 12 (18): 10194-10197. (Journal Id.- I161, NAAS Rating: 4.20).
  • Kumar, Anurag and Tripathi, V. K. (2020). Effect of Azotobacter, PSB and vermicompost on growth, flowering, yield and quality of strawberry (Fragaria x ananassa Duch.) cv. Chandler. Progressive Horticulture 52 (2): 157-161. (Journal Id.- P159, NAAS Rating: 3.53).

B. Book Publications: 09

  • “Recent Advances in Agricultural Sciences” (2009). Dwivedi, K.N., Singh, Poonam, Yadav, V.K. and Tripathi, V.K. (Eds.). Published from C. S. Azad Univ. of Agri. & Tech., Kanpur.
  • “Experimental Approaches in Horticulture” (2017). Tripathi, Vivek Kumar. AGRO India Publication, Allahabad, pp 01-192. ISBN: 987-81-929086-6-3
  • “Phal Sabji Turai Uprant Prabandhan Evam Prasanskaran” (In Hindi) (2017). Asrey, Ram and Tripathi, Vivek Kumar. Kalyani Publication, New Delhi, pp 1-280. ISBN: 978-93-272-9336-4
  • “Farmers’ Centric Agri-innovation for Sustainable Development” (2017). Kumar, M., Mohan, M., Kumar, K., Tripathi, V.K., Kushwaha, S.P. and Tripathi, S. Nikhil Publishers & Distributers, Agra, pp 01-119. ISBN: 978-93-86281-64-7
  • “Farmers’ Centric Agri-innovation for Sustainable Development” (Comp/Abst. Book) (2017). Kumar, M., Kumar, K., Yadav, V.K., Tripathi, V.K., Sachan, C.P. and Mohan, M. CSAUA&T, Kanpur and Alumni Assoc, CSAU, Kanpur
  • “Production Technology of Fruits and Plantation Crops” (In Hindi) (2019). Shukla, Rajendra Kumar and Tripathi, Vivek Kumar. Kalyani Publication, New Delhi, pp 01-224. ISBN: 978-93-5359-447-3
  • “Production Technology of Vegetables and Spices” (In Hindi) (2019). Shukla, Rajendra Kumar; Pandey, Ashok Kumar and Tripathi, Vivek Kumar. Kalyani Publication, New Delhi, pp 01-192. ISBN: 978-93-272-9788-1
  • “Vegetable Science” (In Hindi) (2020). Shukla, Rajendra Kumar and Tripathi, Vivek Kumar. Kalyani Publication, New Delhi, pp 01-160. ISBN: 978-93-89900-66-8
  • “Mango: Production, Protection and Post-harvest Technology” (2020). V. K. Tripathi and Ankur Sharma Narendra Publishing House, New Delhi, pp-1-487+1-22 ISBN: 978-93-89695-01-4

C. Book chapters: 13

  • Tripathi, V.K., Shukla, H.S., Yadav, V.K. and Singh, Poonam (2009). “Post-harvest Management of Fruits and Vegetables”. In “Recent Advances in Agricultural Sciences” (Eds.–Dwivedi, K.N., Singh, P., Yadav, V.K. and Tripathi, V.K.). Published from C. S. Azad Univ. of Agri. & Tech., Kanpur, pp-155-166.
  • Dwivedi, K.N. and Tripathi, V.K. (2009). “Integrated Nutrient Management in Fruit Crops”. In “Recent Advances in Agricultural Sciences” (Eds.–Dwivedi, K.N., Singh, P., Yadav, V.K. and Tripathi, V.K.). Published from C. S. Azad Univ. of Agri. & Tech., Kanpur, pp-241-251.
  • Tripathi, V.K., Sharma, R.M. and Yadav, S.K. (2010). “Yield”. In “The Pear: Production, Post-Harvest Management and Protection” (Eds.–Sharma, R.M.; Pandey, S.N. and Pandey, V.). Published from IDBC Publishers, Lucknow, U.P. (India), pp-415-419. ISBN: 978-81-8189-528-8.
  • Tripathi, V. K., Kumar, S. and Sharma, R. M. (2013). “Nutrient Management in Organic Fruit Cultivation”. In “Organic farming and Management of Biotic Stresses” (Eds.–Biswas, S. K. and Pal, Samir) Published from Biotech Books Pub. New Delhi, pp- 615-632. ISBN: 978-81-7622-306-5
  • Kumar, S.; Tripathi, V. K. and Sharma, R.M. (2013). “Post-harvest Management of Organically Grown Fruits”. In “Organic farming and Management of Biotic Stresses” (Eds.–Biswas, S. K. and Pal, Samir) Published from Biotech Books Pub. New Delhi, pp- 633-653. ISBN: 978-81-7622-306-5
  • Tripathi, V. K. (2016). Potential and Challenges in Protected Cultivation of Horticultural Crops. In “Recent Advance in Diversified Agricultural System” (Eds.– Singh, S.K., Gangwar, R.K. and Singh, B.D.), ISBN: 978-81-920370-1-1, Published from Shri Gyan Sagar Publication (India), 1430/36, Indira Nagar I Meerut, Uttar Pradesh, pp. 16-22.
  • Tripathi, V.K.; Sharma. R.M. and Kumar, S. (2019). Verities. In Strawberries: Production. Post-harvest Management and Protection ((Eds.–R. M. Sharma, R. Yamdagini, Dubey, A.K. and Pandey, V.), CRC Press, Taylor & Francis Group, U.S.A., pp 81-120 INBN No. 13: 978-1-4987-9609-5
  • Tripathi, V.K.; Kumar, S. and Dubey, V. (2019). Use of Plant Bio-regulators. In Strawberries: Production. Post-harvest Management and Protection ((Eds.–R. M. Sharma, R. Yamdagini, Dubey, A.K. and Pandey, V.), CRC Press, Taylor & Francis Group, U.S.A., pp 349-357 INBN No. 13: 978-1-4987-9609-5
  • Tripathi, V.K.; Kumar, S. and Dubey, V. (2019). Yield and Varietal Performance. In Strawberries: Production. Post-harvest Management and Protection ((Eds.–R. M. Sharma, R. Yamdagini, Dubey, A.K. and Pandey, V.), CRC Press, Taylor & Francis Group, U.S.A., pp 403-409 INBN No. 13: 978-1-4987-9609-5.
  • Mishra, A., Rai, G., Tripathi, V. K. and Solomon, S. (2019). Role of Bio-fertilizers in Crop production. In proceedings of the International Multidisciplinary Academic Conference Malaysia, 2019, held at University of Malaya, Wisma R&D, Kuala Lumpur, during 16-18 August 2019, pp- 12-20. ISBN 978-93-86435-85-9.
  • Tripathi, V.K., Solomon S. and Mishra, A. (2019). Organic Crop Production through Bio-Enhancers. In proceedings of the International Multidisciplinary Academic Conference Malaysia, 2019, held at University of Malaya, Wisma R&D, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia during 16-18 August 2019, pp-21-30. ISBN 978-93-86435-85-9.
  • Tripathi, V.K.; Kumar, S., Dubey, V. and Md. Abu Nayyer (2020). High-Density Planting in Fruit Crops for Enhancing Fruit Productivity. Sustainable Agriculture: Advances in Technological Interventions. (Singh. Ajoy Kumar and Patel, Vishwa Bandhu, Eds.). Apple Academic Press and CRC Press, Taylor & Francis Group, U.S.A., pp 253-267. ISBN 13:978-1-77188-853-0 (Hardcover) & 13:978-0-42932-583-0 (eBook).
  • Tripathi, V.K. and Solomon S. (2020). Bio-enhancers: A boon for organic horticulture crop production: Horticulture in the Vanguard of Climate Change (S. Rameshkumar, K. Manivannan, Ct. Sathappan, Arumugam Shakila And D. Dhana Sekaran Eds.). Published by Garden Glory Human empowerment co-operative Limited, Jammu, pp-57-65. ISBN 978-93-5407-228-8

D. Practical Manuals-12

S. No.

Course Code

Title

Semester

                  According to 3rd Dean’s Committee for B.Sc. (Ag.) Hons:

 

1.

HOR-201

Fundamentals of Horticulture

III

2.

HOR-202

Fruit and Plantation Crops                                               

IV

3.

HOR-302

Post-harvest Management of Fruits & Vegetables

V

4.

HOR-302

Ornamental Horticulture

VI

5.

HOR-401

Production Technology of Medicinal & Aromatic Plants

VIII

According to 4th Dean’s Committee for B.Sc. (Ag.) Hons:

6.

HOR-101

Production Technology of Fruit Crops                            

I

7.

HOR-201

Production Technology of Vegetables and Flowers

III

According to 4th Dean’s Committee for B.Sc. (Hort.) Hons:

8.

FSC-101

Fundamentals of Horticulture

I

9.

FSC-102

Plant Propagation and Nursery Management                

II

10.

FSC-103

Tropical and Sub-tropical Fruits                                      

III

                  According to 5th Dean’s Committee for B.Sc. (Ag.) Hons:

11.

HOR-222

Production Technology for Fruit and Plantation Crops  

IV

12.

RHWE-411 & 412

Rural Horticulture Work Experience

VII

Prospective work plan:

03 years:

  • Development of different teaching-aids for skill up-gradation of under & postgraduate students.
  • Collection and maintenance of different minor fruits in the department from different regions.
  • Standardization of protocol for organic farming in various fruit crops.

03-05 years:

  • Development of /Standardization of propagation technologies for different fruit crops with respect to changing climate through research work with post-graduate students.
  • Standardization of low-cost production technology in changing climatic conditions in different fruit crops under central U.P. conditions.
  • Standardization of post-harvest techniques and efficient processing techniques for various fruits.

<05 years:

  • Standardization and popularization of minor fruits production technologies for different minor fruit crops.
  • Standardization of agro-techniques for protected cultivation of some specific fruits such as strawberry and cape gooseberry.

View of Banana Field

Banana plants in Bearing

Guava in Bearing

Jackfruit in Bearing

Field View of Gladiolus cv Sapna

Flowering in Mango cv Amrapalli

Mango cv Amrapali in Bearing

Black Polythene mulching in Strawberry cv Chandler

Organic mulching in Strawberry cv Chandler

Marigold intercropping in Aonla cv NA-7 Orchard

Aonla NA-7 in Bearing

Litchi in Bearing

Kinnow in Bearing

Banana cv G-9 Bunch

Facilities Available:

Presently department has 13 acres of Garden having-

  • Well established four blocks of Mango cultivars Ampralli, Dashehahi, etc.
  • Well established two block of Litchi cultivars Calcuttia, Rose Scented and Dehradoon.
  • Well established block of Ber cv. Penwadi, Banarasi Karaka.
  • Well established block of Phalsa cv. Sharbati
  • Well established block of various citrus species fruits such as Kinnow, Mosambi, Kagzi lime, Grape fruit, etc.
  • Well established two blocks of Aonla having plants of cvs. NA-7, NA-9, Banarasi, Chakaiya, Balwant, Deshi, etc.
  • Well established two blocks of Jackfruit.Deshi,
  • Well established block of Jamun.
  • Well established block of Pomegranate cultivars Kandhari, Ganesh.
  • Well established block of Guava cultivars L-49 and Allahabadi Safeda.
  • Well established two blocks of Rose flowers having different cultivars.
  • Well established block of Sapota cultivars Cricket Ball, Kala Patti, DSH-1 and DSH-2.
  • Different species of Shrubs, Ornamental and Flowering plants are also in the garden.
  • A modal of Sunken Garden is also there in the Department.
  • Few plants of other minor fruits such as Custard Apple, Bael, Loquat, Tamarind, Wood apple (Kaintha), Monkey Fruit, Karonda and Low chilling peach etc., are also present in the garden.
  • Nursery in two hectare area having different sapling/plants of various species of ornamentals, annuals, perennials, flowering avenue trees, different fruit species, medicinal and aromatic plants for practical work of students and for selling to the orchardists/ city peoples for beautification of land.

    Sufficient building for staff.

    One Smart class room

    Well equipped two lab for research analysis and practical training to the students.

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